Art

Art Ethos

Art at The Willows is essential for developing confidence and self-expression. It is a powerful tool – allowing students to communicate and express their thoughts and feelings about the world around them and their own internal world.

Art is a “can do” practical subject nurtured by an inspiring, calm classroom atmosphere which allows students to progress as artists.

At The Willows, students combine observational skills with development of ideas and concepts to cultivate their own personal style. At every stage, students have maximum flexibility with materials to enable an innovative, exploratory approach.

Individual responses and diversity are celebrated as there is no 'right' or 'wrong' way to create a piece of art work.

At The Willows, students gain confidence and learn to take pride in the work they create.

Miss I. Winson
Subject Leader of Art
The Willows School

Open PDF

Computing

Open PDF Open PDF

Design Technology


Design Technology provides the opportunity for all pupils to gain knowledge and skill which are important throughout life. It provides practical learning experiences which are accessible to all pupils, allowing them to use their knowledge and understanding from across the curriculum and apply this to every day experiences.

It is an opportunity for pupils to design and make real products, provides a sense of achievement and helps pupils gain a higher level of self esteem. Pupils will gain confidence from seeing their own work progress from an idea to an actual product.


Design Technology Aims:

  • Make choices and be involved in sensory and communication activities within a practical learning experience.
  • Consider the needs and preferences of others, as well as themselves, so developing their social awareness.
  • Focus on activities that are meaningful to them.
  • Use a range of methods to communicate avoiding the need to rely on the written word.
  • Carry out practical tasks that contribute to the development of individual or group projects.
  • Use ICT to develop and enhance their work.
  • Work at own pace and level, with appropriate staff support and intervention.
  • Develop own creativity.

Technology gives all pupils an invaluable opportunity to use and apply knowledge gained elsewhere, extend the breadth and depth of their experiences and gain valuable technological knowledge and experiences.


Food Technology

Food Technology is an essential life skill. The aim is for every pupil to be able to shop and prepare and cook food to be able to feed themselves.

Key stage 2

 

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Year 4

Cutting and spreading.

 

What can you do with an egg?

Teddy bears picnic

Year 5

Fillings and toppings.

What can you do with fruit?

How nice does your food look?

Year 6

Healthy lunchbox.

Visit to Supermarket.

How do you like your potatoes?

Using the cooker.

 

Key stage 3

 

Autum1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Year 7

Safety and hygiene

Safety and hygiene

Baking  (basic skills)

Visit to Supermarket

Baking  (basic skills)

Healthy eating

Visit to Supermarket

Healthy eating

Year 8

Eggs and dairy foods

Meat

Visit to Butchers

Fish

Visit to Fishmongers

High in fibre and low fat foods

Fruit and vegetables

Visit to Supermarket

Fruit and Vegetables

Year 9

Basic ingredients

 

Basic ingredients

Visit to Worsbrough Mill

Electrical equipment and the cooker

Visit to Electrical store

Electrical equipment and the cooker

Processed foods

Processed foods

 

Key stage 4

 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Year 10

A balanced diet

Enterprise activity Christmas meal

Meals of the day

Basic recipes

Shopping and food storage

Healthy Eating Entertaining

Year 11

Introduction to school restaurants

Food groups

Special diets

Assessments

Microwave cooking

Assessments

Shopping on a budget

Assessments

Final Assessment

CIEH level 1 Food Safety


Design Technology

Key stage 2

 

Autumn - textiles

Spring – resistant materials/ systems and control

Summer - graphics

Year 4

Textiles -  embellishing fabrics to make a fabric hand puppet

Resistant materials - working with a range of woods, metals and plastics to make a key ring.

Graphic products - using paper and card to making moving pictures.

Year 5

Using fabric paints and dye to colour fabric – Tie dye t-shirts

Using wood and electronics to make a board game.

Design and make a Charlie and chocolate factory chocolate box using tessellation and repeat patterns.

Year 6

Stitching skills to make a Technicolor dream coat.

Pneumonic systems to make a moving monster.

Using card and graphical writing skills to make a pop up fairy tail book


Key stage 3 – 3 design and make projects following the design process.

 

Autumn - textiles

Spring – resistant materials/ systems and control

Summer - graphics

Year 7

Puppets from around the world ( finger, hand, rod, string and body)

Abstract art style key rings using wood and plastic.( Introduction to the saw an drill)

Pop up animals using paper and card. Introduction to graphical text.

Year 8

21st century themed wall hangings – introduction to the sewing machine.

Transport themed topic to making a moving toy.

Logo’s - to design and make a logo to use on a range of products. Introduction to points of sale.

Year 9

Pop Art cushions- using ICT.

Cultural photo frames

Pop up story books- introduction to typography.


Key stage 4

 

Autumn - textiles

Spring – resistant materials

Summer - graphics

Year 10

Educational learning play mat/ toy made from fabrics for a child under 7.

Memphis inspired clocks for the home.

Interior design and layout for a room in a house.

Year 11

Year 11 students work through an AQA product design scheme of work to create a coursework portfolio.

Pupils can work in any of the area to design and make a product for a target market:

Textile

Resistant materials

Graphic products


Design technology assessment

Pupils across all key stages are assessed using ‘I can statements’ taken from the National Curriculum. The pupil’s progress in Design Technology and Food Technology is assessed termly and tracked throughout the year.


Qualifications

In Design Technology pupils have the opportunity to achieve an Entry Level certificate in Product Design.

In Food technology pupils have the opportunity to achieve an Entry Level Certificate in Food Studies (City and Guilds), a Food Safety award Level 1  (C.I.E.H)  and CERTA qualifications in running a Restaurant and Catering (fast food)

DTfoot

English

At the Willows School we believe that learning English is fundamental to supporting all aspects of communication. All our learners use the English Language as a foundation on which their learning is based. It is also the medium through which other curriculum areas are experienced.

Through our English curriculum we aim to give our pupils the opportunities to:

  • Develop their abilities to communicate and interact with others, to speak, listen and respond in a range of social situations.
  • Develop their skills in all four main areas of the English language; Speaking, Listening, Reading and Writing.
  • Access a wide range of literature which will enhance and widen their experiences.
  • Develop their ability to use writing as a communication skill.
  • Develop their creativity and imagination through use of language.

At the Willows school the English Curriculum is planned to take into account the needs of all pupils. We take into account the difficulties that individual students experience with communication and English language. We work to build on the strengths of our learners, and support them to overcome areas of weakness.

Qualifications

Entry level English.

English GCSE when applicable.

Long term Plans

Open KS2 PDF Open KS3 PDF Open KS4 PDF Open In the Comminity PDF

HUMANITIES

GEOGRAPHY & HISTORY

 

This year we have introduced a new scheme of work that has been developed to ensure that pupils will have full coverage of the National Curriculum in History and Geography. At the Willows, History and Geography are taught throughout KS2 and KS3 and follows a programme of study for each year very carefully and provides the right balance between using History and Geography as the main drivers but ensuring that creative and expressive arts gets a fair representation across the curriculum.

 

       Each set of Learning Objectives links directly to the History or Geography knowledge, skills and understanding to ensure that pupils learning is progressive and continuous.

 

      Each lesson has a suggested ‘wow’ or hook and its own suggested reflection. By using these we will get a more complete level of challenge for the pupils.

 

      You will also note that every opportunity has been taken to help pupils apply their English and maths skills where it is possible to do so.

 

      Where possible and appropriate, visits are made to further support the learning taking place in school. Educational visits are made to historical places, museums, recycling plants, contrasting localities and many more places. We also feel it is important that the pupils at The Willows School take part in local studies within the area of Thurcroft and wider areas of Rotherham and Sheffield. As part of our whole school curriculum we also hold Curriculum weeks which are often linked with Religious Education, History and Geography topics

 

      Every attempt has been made to bring History and Geography to life by taking starting points from the pupil’s context. In this way it is hoped that History and Geography will be viewed as exciting and interesting on a two year rolling programme of study.

 

      During the year there will be also be whole school topic days to ensure full coverage of the curriculum that meets the needs of pupils.

 

National Curriculum Requirements of Geography for KS2 pupils

Pupils will develop knowledge about the world, the United Kingdom and their locality. They will explore, experience and understand basic subject-specific vocabulary relating to human and physical geography and begin to use geographical skills, including first-hand observation, to enhance their locational awareness.

Pupils will be taught to:

Location knowledge

      name and locate the world’s seven continents and five oceans

      name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the UK and its surrounding seas

Place knowledge

      understand geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of a small area of the UK, and of a small area in a contrasting non-European country

Human and physical geography

      identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the UK and the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles

      use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to:

      key physical features, including: beach, cliff, coast, forest, hill, mountain, sea, ocean, river, soil, valley, vegetation, season and weather

      key human features, including: city, town, village, factory, farm, house, office, port, harbour and shop

Geographical skills and fieldwork

      use world maps, atlases and globes to identify the UK and its countries, as well as the countries, continents and oceans studied at this key stage

      use simple compass directions and locational and directional language to describe the location of features and routes on a map

      use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features; devise a simple map; and use and construct basic symbols in a key

      use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the geography of their school and its grounds and the key human and physical features of its surrounding environment.  

 

National Curriculum Requirements of History for Key Stage 2 pupils

Pupils will develop an awareness of the past, using common words and phrases relating to the passing of time. They should know where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework and identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods. They will experience and use a wide vocabulary of everyday historical terms. They should ask and answer questions, choosing and using parts of stories and other sources to show that they know and understand key features of events. They should understand some of the ways in which we find out about the past and identify different ways in which it is represented.

Pupils will be taught about:

      changes within living memory. Where appropriate, these should be used to reveal aspects of change in national life

      events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally.

      the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements. Some should be used to compare aspects of life in different periods.

      significant historical events, people and places in their own locality.

 

National Curriculum Requirements of Geography for Key Stage 3 pupils

Pupils will extend their knowledge and understanding beyond the local area to include the UK and Europe, North and South America. This will include the location and characteristics of a range of the world’s most significant human and physical features. They will develop their use of geographical knowledge, understanding and skills to enhance their locational and place knowledge.

Pupils should be taught to:

Location knowledge

      locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe and North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities

      name and locate counties and cities of the UK, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features, and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time

      identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night)

Place knowledge

      understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the UK, a region in a European country, and a region within North or South America

Human and physical geography

describe and understand key aspects of:

      physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle

      human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links

Geographical skills and fieldwork

      use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied

      use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key to build their knowledge of the UK and the wider world

      use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

 

National Curriculum Requirements of History for Key Stage 3 pupils

Pupils will continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study. They should note connections, contrasts and trends over time and develop the appropriate use of historical terms. They should regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance. They should construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information. They should understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.

Pupils will be taught about:

·         changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age

·         the Roman Empire and its impact on Britain

·         Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots

·         the Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor

 

Scheme of work Year 3 & 4

Enquiry questions

AUTUMN 1

 

YEAR A

Why can’t a meerkat live in the North Pole?

 

AUTUMN 2

 

Where do the leaves go to in winter?

 

 

 

 SPRING 1

 

Why is the XBox

more fun than

Grandma and

Grandad’s old toys?

SPRING 2

 

Would Michael Jackson have won Britain’s Got Talent?

 

SUMMER 1 

 

Where do and might the wheels on the bus go?

 

 

 

SUMMER 2 

 

Stone Age to 1066

Who first lived in Britain?

YEAR B

 Why can’t my Nemo live in the North Sea?

 

Where do daisies go in winter?

What has changed since your grandparents were young?

Who was famous when your mum and dad were little?

Where could the school mini bus take us?

Ancient Civilizations

      Ancient Greece

Has Greece always been in the news?

Year A - academic year 2016-17             Year B - academic year 2017-18

 

Scheme of work Year 5 & 6

Enquiry questions

Autumn 1

 

Year A What would Dora the Explorer/ Ben Ten find exciting about Thurcroft?

 

 

Autumn 2

 

Year A What were the people who lived here like a 100 years ago?

 

 

 

Spring 1

 

Year A How have Rosa Parks and Nelson Mandela helped to make the world a better place?

Spring 2

 

Year A Where would you prefer to live: England or Africa?

 

 

 

 

Summer 1

 

Year A Why do we love to be beside the seaside?

 

 

 

 

Summer 2

 

Year A The Roman Empire and its impact on Britain

 

Year B What would Dora the Explorer/ Ben Ten find exciting about Rotherham? 

Year B What was it like when the Queen came to the throne in 1953?

Year B Why were Christopher Columbus and Neil Armstrong brave people?

Year B Where would you prefer to live: England or India?

Year B Why do people live at the seaside?

Year B Ancient Egypt

 

Year A – academic year 2016-17                  B – academic year 2017-18

 

Scheme of work Year 7 & 8

Enquiry questions

Teachers to decide on when to teach Year 7 & 8 units in any order depending on the interests and needs of pupils. Please see termly class curriculum overview for when units taught.

Y7

Autumn 1

Why do so many people choose to go to the Mediterranean for their holidays?

Autumn 2

Gunpowder, treason and plot

Why should gunpowder, treason and plot never be forgotten?

Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots

Were the Anglo-Saxons really smashing?

Geography

 

What makes the Earth angry?

Geography

Why is the River Don so important to Sheffield?

History

How can we re-discover the wonder of Ancient Egypt?

Y8

Autumn 1

Geography

Why has Greece always been in the news?

Autumn 2 Gunpowder, treason and plot + Charles 1 execution

Why should gunpowder, treason and plot never be forgotten?

Geography

 

Why is London such a cool place to live?

History

 

Who first lived in Britain?

 

History

The Viking and Anglo-Saxon

Who were the early law makers?

Geography 

 

Where would you choose to build a city?

 

Scheme of work Year 9

Enquiry questions

Teachers to decide on when to teach Year 9 units in any order depending on the interests and needs of pupils. Please see termly class curriculum overview for when units taught.

Stone Age to 1066

 

The Roman Empire and its impact on Britain

 

 

Why were the Romans so powerful and what did we learn from them?

A Study of an aspect or theme in British history, beyond 1066

 

 

 

Why were the Norman castles certainly not bouncy?

Significant Themes in British history (Preferably from a Local interest point of view)

 

World War 2 – Battle of Britain

How did the Battle of Britain change World War 2? 

Geography skills to be taught where possible in all units

Human & Physical

use the eight points of a compass, four-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world

use fieldwork to observe, measure and record the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Rainforests of the Amazon

Brazil – physical features

 

Why should the rainforests be important to us all?

Brazil –human Geography trade and growing economy

- Fair Trade

Why is Brazil in the news again?

UK and wider world (+ Compass Points)

 

I’m a Year 9 pupil, can you get me out of here?

 

Mrs. Perry

Humanities (History & Geography) Coordinator

September 2016

Maths

Mathematics is an essential part of everyday life for everybody regardless of their background, needs or ability level. At The Willows we ensure that all of our pupils experience Mathematics at their level, covering the vast spectrum of the subject. We are dedicated in teaching all our pupils to achieve their maximum potential in Mathematics which will aid them in life.

It is important that Mathematics is presented in a fun and varied way as we believe this promotes learning and helps understanding, therefore we use practical equipment, games, interactive whiteboard resources as well as more traditional exercises due to the fact that everyone has a different preferred learning style which we aim to cater for.

As a department we offer accredited qualifications which are appropriate for the individual and we aim to support our pupils in achieving at least one recognised qualification and give the opportunity for pupils to work towards extra options where appropriate. These qualifications include AQA Entry Level Certificate in Mathematics levels 1 to 3 and AQA Mathematics GCSE, CERTA units are continuously developed to suit the needs of the learners.

We are the only special school to have gained Centre of Excellence status for Personal Finance Education as well as being awarded with the Platinum award for Excellence in Enterprise Education, we have also won several national competitions which is encouraging to both pupils and staff that what we are offering as a school is valued and of an excellent standard.

The curriculum incorporates the Basic Skills of Mathematics as a weekly focus with a diet of topics from the other strands. The Basic Skills include addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, time and money.


Here is an overview of the topics we teach at KS2:

Autumn Term 1

Count, order, place value

2D shapes

Sorting and classifying

Addition

Spring Term 1

Count, order, place value

2D shapes

Length

Addition

Summer Term 1

Addition/multiplication

Money

Capacity

Subtraction/division

Autumn Term 2

Weight

Collecting and displaying data

Subtraction

Money

Spring Term 2

Symmetry

Time 1—calendar

Subtraction

Money

Summer Term 2

Time Units

3D shapes

Position and Co-ordinates

Fractions

 

Here is an overview of the topics we teach at KS3:

Autumn Term 1

Count, Order, Place Value

2D shapes 1—Naming and Describing

Addition

3D shapes 1-Naming, Describing, Sorting

Collecting Data—Tallies

Money

Spring Term 1

Division (Long ÷ where appropriate)

Weight

Place Value/Rounding

Number patterns—Pig Pens inv.

Pictograms/Pie charts

Using a Calculator

Summer Term 1

Length—Measuring

Areas

Fractions

Percentages/Basic skills

2D shapes 2-Tesselations

Maps/Position/Direction

Autumn Term 2

Angles

Subtraction

Multiplication

Bar Charts

Length—Perimeter

Christmas Maths

Spring Term 2

Negative Numbers

Time 1—Calendar

Symmetry

Money-Catalogues/Shops worksheets

Probability

 

Summer Term 2

Capacity

3D shapes 2-Making

‘My Money Week’ pfeg

Co-ordinates

Time 2 - Units of Time

Place Value/Special Numbers —
+/-10 x/÷ 10, 100, 1000

Money-Holidays


Here is an overview of the topics we teach at KS4:

AQA ELC

Component 1:   Properties of number

Component2:   The four operations

Component 3:   Ratio

Component 4:   Money

Component 5:   The Calendar and Time

Component 6:   Measures

Component 7:   Geometry

Component 8:   Statistics

 

For each unit there is a set of worksheets which cover all the criteria for levels 1 to 3. After the worksheets have been completed for a unit the test for that unit can be sat under test conditions within the classroom. This process continues for all 8 written units. The teacher is allowed to do any ground work/extra work they feel necessary for each unit but once a sheet has been completed and marked it cannot be re-done.

Once all the units have been sat, the highest scores for 4 of the unit tests are to be chosen and sent along with the portfolio of work for the rest of the units.

The level of entry depends on how many points the pupils achieved in total for all 8 units.

GCSE: Year 10

Number

N1.2 Add, subtract, multiply and divide any number.

Algebra

N5.1, N5.1h  Manipulate algebraic expressions by collecting like terms, by multiplying a single term over a bracket, and by taking out common factors.

Geometry

G1.1 Recall and use properties of angles at a point, angles at a point on a straight line (including right angles), perpendicular lines, and opposite angles at a vertex.

G1.4 Recall the properties and definitions of special types of quadrilateral, including square, rectangle, parallelogram, trapezium, kite and rhombus.

G4.1, G4.1h Calculate perimeters and areas of shapes made from triangles and rectangles.

Statistics and Probability

S3.2, S3.2h  Produce charts and diagrams for various data types. Scatter graphs, stem-and-leaf, tally charts, pictograms, bar diagrams, charts, dual bar charts, pie charts, line graphs, frequency polygons, histograms with equal class intervals.

GCSE: Year 11

Number

N1.4,N1.4h  Approximate to a given power of 10, up to three decimal places and one significant figure.

N1.6 The concepts and vocabulary of factor (divisor), multiple, common factor, highest common factor, least common multiple, prime number and prime factor decomposition.

N1.14, N1.14h  Use calculators effectively and efficiently, including statistical functions.

N2.2 Add and subtract fractions.

N2.7, N2.7h  Calculate with fractions, decimals and percentages.

N3.2 Divide a quantity in a given ratio.

Algebra

N5.4, N5.4h  Set up and solve simple linear equations.

N5.6 Derive a formula, substitute numbers into a formula and change the subject of a formula.

N5.8 Use systematic trial and improvement to find approximate solutions of equations where there is no simple analytical method of solving them.

N6.1 Generate terms of a sequence using term-to-term and position-to-term definitions of the sequence.

N6.2 Use linear expressions to describe the nth term of an arithmetic sequence.

N6.3, N6.3h  Use the conventions for coordinates in the plane and plot points in all four quadrants, including using geometric information.

N6.4 Recognise and plot equations that correspond to straight-line graphs in the coordinate plane, including finding their gradients.

Geometry

G1.2 Understand and use the angle properties of parallel and intersecting lines, triangles and quadrilaterals.

G1.3 Calculate and use the sums of the interior and exterior angles of polygons.

G1.5, G1.5h  Distinguish between centre, radius, chord, diameter, circumference, tangent, arc, sector and segment.

G1.6 Recognise reflection and rotation symmetry of 2D shapes.

G3.9 Draw triangles and other 2D shapes using a ruler and protractor.

G4.4 Calculate volumes of right prisms and of shapes made from cubes and cuboids. Including cylinders.

Statistics and Probability

S3.3, S3.3h  Calculate median, mean, range, mode and modal class.

S5.1 Understand and use the vocabulary of probability and the probability scale.

S5.2 Understand and use estimates or measures of probability from theoretical models (including equally likely outcomes), or from relative frequency.


          

Drawing angles                                           Statistics competition


          

3D Shapes pupils made using Polydron                                   Pizza division








 Food tasting for quality and value for money during
 ‘My Money Week’.

Music

Music, as a subject, is something that any child can access and engage with both independently and in a group. It allows children to develop skills that can be transferred to life but also provides them with a different channel that can be used to express themselves.

Music at The Willows School
It is important that Music is presented in a unique and appealing way that promotes learning but helps build understanding. As a result every lesson aims to incorporate key areas of creativity to open up the children’s imagination regardless of experience and ability. Music is taught to every class in the Lower School and follows the Charanga (http://charanga.com/site) Scheme of work which provides a vast array of musical experiences that are relevant and created around interests of children.

Throughout every lesson children will be given these opportunities to ensure that teaching encompasses all key areas of the subject.

  • Music appreciation – through listening children develop the ability to recognise key features and create their own opinions whilst looking at other cultures and beliefs.
  • Movement – is a way children can show their understanding of pulse, rhythms and enjoyment of various musical styles.
  • Composition – allows children to create their own ideas and representing them in a way that is relevant to individual children enabling them to explore and express their own ideas.
  • Performance – children will organise and participate in concerts that they have practiced for throughout the lessons but also have opportunities for professionals to come in and share their skills. In doing so the children will be able to experience what it is like to be in the audience.

Open PDF

Physical Education

Physical Education develops pupils’ physical competence and confidence and their ability to use these to perform in a range of activities. It promotes skilfulness, physical development and knowledge of the body in action. Physical Education provides opportunities for pupils to be creative, competitive, and cooperative and face up to different challenges as individuals and in groups and teams. It promotes positive attitudes toward healthy and active lifestyles.

Pupils learn how to think in different ways to suit a wide variety of creative, competitive, cooperative and challenging activities. They learn how to plan, perform and evaluate actions, ideas and performances to improve their aptitudes, abilities, preferences and make choices about how to get involved in lifelong physical activity.

National Curriculum for England and Wales; Physical Education; p15

The Willows PE Department Ethos

The Willows School seeks to provide a full, varied and interesting Physical Education curriculum which challenges, engages and excites staff and pupils alike. We see Physical Education as a vital part of the education experience as a whole. We promote the social, moral, spiritual and cultural aspects of sport through inter school and intra school competition.

Aims

The aims and objectives of the PE Department relate directly to those of The Willows Schools Developing Excellence plan as a whole: namely that we endeavour to provide an educational experience that is bespoke in its delivery and content.

The aims are as follows:

  • Each person is unique with particular qualities of personality and character and distinctive strengths and skills.
  • It is our responsibility to really understand what motivates each child to learn and to use this information to provide the highest quality educational opportunities, matched to their individual needs and learning styles.
  • Each child has a right to reach their maximum potential - emotionally, spiritually, socially, morally physically, intellectually and aesthetically.
  • Effort leads to success.
  • Everyone has a right to be listened to and respected, regardless of gender, ability, and race, religion or sexuality, as well as to learn in a safe, calm, nurturing and purposeful environment.
  • We achieve more when we work together co-operatively and in partnership.
  • All children have the right to inclusion within The Willows School, the community and society at large.

Physical Education Qualifications

Pupils at The Willows School may choose to follow a GCSE in Physical Education when they reach KS4. The Willows School has successfully worked alongside Aston Academy now for several years helping children to gain a GCSE in Physical education.

The course outline and further details can be found on the Edexcel website here:

http://www.edexcel.com/quals/gcse/gcse09/pe/Pages/default.aspx

The key objectives of the short modular course are:

Edexcel's GCSEs in Physical Education:

  • encourage students to be inspired, moved and changed by following a broad, coherent, satisfying and worthwhile course of study and to develop an awareness and appreciation of their own and others’ cultures in relation to physical education.
  • encourage creativity and decision-making skills to enable students to plan effectively for performances and to respond to changing situations.
  • prepare students to make informed decisions about further learning opportunities and career choices.
  • enable students to become increasingly physically competent through being actively engaged in a range of physical activities, and to become increasingly effective in their performance in different types of physical activity and roles such as player/participant, leader and official.
  • enable students to develop their ability to engage independently and successfully in different types of physical activity, and to develop and maintain their involvement in physical activity as part of a healthy, active lifestyle.

Results for 2011/12 pupils:

  • 40% of pupils achieved a grade D
  • 60% of pupils achieved a grade E

The Scheme of Work

We are now using the Rawmarsh Scheme of Work for PE. They are in School to act as a guide for teaching lessons and should be adapted to suit the needs of the class.

PE planning for next year

Each teacher will decide how they break down the Rawmarsh Scheme over the year with the exception of games where invasion games should be covered in the winter months so that they fit in with competitions organised across the partnership.

Dance is organised into different themes which range from one lesson long in Foundation up to blocks of four or more lessons in Y6. It is possible to split gymnastics and dance into a number of parts so there is an even spread across the year.

The scheme also gives information about how other areas of the curriculum can be developed through PE thus making it easier to be creative.

Class teachers complete a short term plan for each PE lesson. These list the specific learning objectives for each lesson and give details of how the lessons are to be taught. The class teacher keeps these individual plans, and the class teacher and subject leader often discuss them on an informal basis.

We plan the PE activities so that they build upon the prior learning of the children. While there are opportunities for children of all abilities to develop their skills, knowledge and understanding in each activity area, there is planned progression built into the scheme of work, so that the children are increasingly challenged as they move up through the school.

Contribution of PE to teaching in other curriculum areas

English: PE contributes to the teaching of English in our school by encouraging children to describe what they have done and to discuss how they might improve their performance.

Information and communication technology (ICT): We use ICT to support PE teaching when appropriate. In dance and gymnastics children make video recordings of their performance, and use them to develop their movements and actions. Older children compare each other’s performance from recordings and use these to improve the quality of their work.

Personal, social and health education (PSHE) and citizenship: PE contributes to the teaching of personal, social and health education and citizenship. Children learn about the benefits of exercise and healthy eating, and how to make informed choices about these things.

Spiritual, moral, social and cultural development: The teaching of PE offers opportunities to support the social development of our children through the way we expect them to work with each other in lessons. Groupings allow children to work together and give them the chance to discuss their ideas and performance. Their work in general enables them to develop a respect for other children’s levels of ability, and encourages them to co-operate across a range of activities and experiences. Children learn to respect and work with each other, and develop a better understanding of themselves and of each other.

Year group

Unit

Number of lessons

L1/2

Target Games

6

Travelling Games

7

Chasing Games

3

Partner Games

4

Gymnastics

16

Dance

16

L3

Striking/Fielding Games 1

4

Striking/Fielding Games 2

4

Net Games 1

4

Net Games 2

4

Invasion Games 1

4

Invasion Games 2

4

Gymnastics

16

Dance

16

L4/5

Striking/Fielding Games

8

Net Games

8

Invasion Games

12

Gymnastics

16

Dance

16

L6

Striking/Fielding Games

8

Net Games

7

Invasion Games

13

Gymnastics

16

Dance

16

U1

Striking/Fielding Games

10

Net Games

8

Invasion Games

10

Gymnastics

16

Dance

16

U2/3/4 Classes will continue with the options programme. Those children who wish to follow a certificate in Physical education will take GCSE PE and follow the Aston Academy Scheme of work for Entry Level GCSE. All children will take parting in two lessons Physical Activity if they do not participate in the GCSE options programme.

P. S. D.


PSD is a holistic approach to lifelong learning and life skills.

PSD is taught throughout school and focus areas are designed to meet the needs of the class and individuals within the class.

The bungalow is a unique and naturally realistic base where everyday life skills are developed and supported. Raising aspirations, building confidence and self-esteem go hand in hand with the practical activities associated with everyday living.

Basic functional skills such as using money, telling the time, reading timetables, filling forms etc. are developed in realistic situations within the community with a real purpose embedding the learning.

Road safety and travel training are recognised as an important aspect to personal development, in upper school an individual training package will be developed to suit the needs of each child moving at their pace.

The learning will be supported by a variety of relevant qualifications from CERTA.

At The Willows we believe that supporting our families to lay good foundations in preparation for the futures of the children is a valuable aspect of our bespoke curriculum.

Julie Annesley Upper School PSD/life skills.

Sue Briggs Travel training and transitions

Ellie Purshouse Life skills.


Lower School PSD Curriculum

From September 2015

 

Aims for The Willows PSD curriculum

 

    The school curriculum should aim to provide opportunities for all pupils to learn and to achieve.

 

    The school curriculum should aim to promote pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development and prepare all pupils for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of life.

 

These two aims reinforce each other. The personal development of pupils, spiritually, morally, socially and culturally, plays a significant part in their ability to learn and achieve. Development in both areas is essential to raising standards of attainment of all pupils.

 

In other words, children’s personal and social development is at the heart of the school curriculum, and the interdependency of the two aims is stressed:

Attainment=+Learning and AchievementPersonal development



Each cohort at The Willows School is different and diverse and so are the individuals within that cohort. The key to the success of the PSD curriculum is to identify pupils’ needs and set priorities for personal and social development               

In conducting a needs analysis for each cohort, teachers can identify key oppourtunities that children will benefit from.

Possible Questions:

        At what stage of development are pupils?

        What are the milestones for this year group and the events that take place during this year?

        How much do pupils already know and what skills do they have or need?

        What can we learn from their behaviour in class and in the playground?

 

Learning Outcomes for KS2 Pupils

Opportunities to enable children to:

Skills

Knowledge

Attitudes and Values

 

Develop

confidence

and

responsibility

and make the

most of their

abilities

1 Recognise and name feelings, including those associated with change e.g. new family member.

2 Begin to manage feelings positively and effectively.

3 Ask for and give permission.

Recognise what they are good at from what others tell them.

4 Express positive qualities about themselves.

5 Respond with increasing confidence to new people and situations.

6 Set simple targets for themselves.

7 Perform simple tasks independently.

1 Know their personal likes and dislikes.

2 Understand ideas of good and bad, and right and wrong.

3 Know some of the things which can cause different emotions.

4 Know what they are good at.

5 Know that it is alright to make mistakes.

1 Believe in fairness for all.

2 Develop confidence when expressing opinions about things that matter to them.

3 Think about what responsibility means.

4 Recognise their uniqueness, feel good about themselves and be proud of their achievements.

5 Want to do well, and make the most of opportunities and talents.

6 Persevere and overcome difficulties.

 

Prepare to

play an active

role as citizens

1 Listen to the teacher and to a friend.

2 Hold the attention of a listener.

3 Ask simple questions of a range of adults.

4 Take part in discussions about matters relating to their lives e.g. the school environment, bullying.

5 Recognise and make safe choices based on right and wrong/good or bad.

6 Agree rules for the group/classroom.

7 Show some responsibility for self and others in and out of school e.g. classroom, playground, school visits.

8 Observe surroundings and suggest how they might help to improve them.

9 Work together as a group or class on a project about a social or environmental issue.

1 Know the choices open to them e.g. in food, games and activities.

2 Know the school and classroom rules and why they are necessary.

3 Know how to behave in different situations.

4 Understand that other people, pets and plants have needs.

5 Know that all people have the same basic needs, and the difference between needs and wants.

6 Know the different groups to which they belong e.g. family, friends, and school.

7 Know the world immediately around them including local services e.g. library, leisure centre, museum etc.

8 Know about the jobs of adults in the classroom, school and around them.

9 Know what improves and harms their local environment and how they can look after it.

10 Know about shops, services and advertising, and what they do for us; know that they have to pay for what they buy.

1 Be aware of their right to decide.

2 Think about what is important to them in making choices.

3 Think about their responsibilities to their friends, class, family.

4 Care about people who have unmet needs.

5 Consider the value of being part of different groups and communities e.g. a family and local community.

6 Appreciate and want to care for their environment: classroom, school grounds, local area.

7 Value natural resources and understand that they are limited.

8 Respect their own and other people’s property, personal and public.

9 Show concern for the impact of their actions on others and the environment.

10 Want to participate, make a difference.

11 Think about how money can be spent other than on themselves.

 

3 Develop a

healthy, safer

lifestyle

1 Make simple choices e.g. between foods, activities.

2 Maintain personal hygiene e.g. washing, teeth cleaning, and toilet routines.

3 Recognise potential risks to safety of self and others from people, situations and in the environment.

4 Say ‘no’ when subject to pressure/something feels wrong.

5 Ask for help from adults.

6 Follow simple safety rules and instructions.

1 Know what keeps them healthy: food, exercise, rest.

2 Understand the concept of growing from young to old and that they are growing and changing.

3 Know the correct names for the external parts of the body including the sexual parts.

4 Know what is safe to put into/onto the body and that all substances can be harmful if not used properly.

5 Know that all medicines are drugs but not all drugs are medicines.

6 Know places that are safe, where to get help and the people in their community who can help them.

7 Know the rules for keeping safe at home and at school e.g. roads, fire, water, household substances, ‘Stranger, Danger’, knives, sun screens, medicines, tablets, and solvents.

8 Know when to keep a secret and when to tell.

1 Be proud of their body, enjoy what it can do and treat it with respect.

2 Think about why it is important to know what they are eating.

3 Want to be healthy and clean.

4 Think about why they need to take care and be safe in what they do.

5 Care about keeping themselves and others safe.

 

 

Develop good

relationships

and respect

the differences

between

people

1 Voice differences of opinion sensitively and courteously; say sorry, thank you.

2 Recognise ways in which their own choices and behaviour affect others.

3 Co-operate with others in work and play; share; take turns.

4 Show respect by listening to what other people say.

5 Recognise worth in others, and say why someone is special to them.

6 Make new friends; cope with losing friends.

Help to care for pets and plants.

1 Know that different types of family have common features and functions.

2 Know that there are similarities and differences between people: gender, appearance, abilities, families, cultural background etc.

3 Understand that boys and girls can both do the same tasks and enjoy the same things; but that stories and the television sometimes say that boys do this and girls do that.

4 Know that people have things in common but that every individual is unique.

5 Understand how to be a friend and that friendships can change.

6 Know the people who look after them and their different roles and responsibilities.

7 Know what bullying is and what to do if they experience or see bullying.

8 Understand that there is a difference between accidental and purposeful hurting.

 

1 Consider the value of being a friend and having friends.

2 Be proud of who they are and understand that difference does not mean better or worse.

3 Value other people’s achievements.

4 Begin to accept everyone as an individual.

5 Respect others’ needs, feelings and opinions.

6 Be willing to care for others.

7 Value the ways in which their family is special.

8 Think about what trust and reliability mean.

9 Think about why bullying is unacceptable.

 

 

 

Learning Outcomes for KS3 Pupils

Opportunities to enable children to:

Skills

Knowledge

Attitudes and Values

 

Develop

confidence

and

responsibility

and make the

most of their

abilities

Ask questions and talk confidently with adults and peers about their thoughts and feelings.

Record information about current interests and choices they will have to make in the future.

Express positive things about themselves and others.

Use simple vocabulary for describing personal effectiveness and setting personal goals.

Prepare for and manage the change to secondary school.

Show reliance in finishing tasks.

Recognise the need to ask for support sometimes, and whom to ask and how.

Recognise and respond to a variety of emotions in themselves and others, such as jealousy, anger, excitement.

Be able to express feelings in different ways and recognise the impact on others.

Transfer a skill learned in one situation to another context.

Interview adults to find out about job roles or tasks.

Know what is special about them: abilities, interests, strengths and weaknesses.

Know that puberty brings about changes in emotions.

Know ways of coping with difficult emotions, fears and worries.

Know the range of jobs and work roles carried out by people they know and what they like/dislike about those jobs.

Know the range of knowledge, skills and personal qualities required for different types of work.

Know how their strengths can help a group to perform a task.

Know about the basic ways of saving money.

 

Enjoy life at school, acting confidently and appropriately.

Have realistic aspirations when target setting.

Look forward confidently to the transition to secondary school.

Value opportunities for new experiences in and out of school, including opportunities to meet adults other than teachers.

Appreciate the importance of taking responsibility for themselves and their behaviour.

Respect other people’s work and career choices.

Consider why saving money is important.

Consider how different values influence how they spend money e.g. pocket money.

 

Prepare to

play an active

role as citizens

Use different ways to communicate and express personal and group views about social and environmental issues. Contribute to decision-making in a small group e.g. setting rules for the class and the school.

Use local environmentally sustaining facilities e.g. paper/can banks.

Put themselves in someone else’s shoes e.g. people who are less fortunate than them.

Resolve problems/conflicts democratically through discussion, using different approaches to decision-making and reaching consensus.

Make decisions about use of scarce resources; evaluate information about priorities for spending: personal, community, and environment.

Make informed decisions on how to allocate fund-raising money.

Recognise when choices are affected by the media and other influences.

Understand why school rules are made and the consequences of breaking them; relate this to simple knowledge about the law and understand that rules and laws are designed to protect.

Know the variety of communities to which they simultaneously belong: family, school, local, national,

European and worldwide, and the interdependence of individuals, groups and communities.

Understand that rights bring responsibilities at home, at school and in the community.

Have a simple understanding of democratic processes and how they can be applied in school and government.

Know about local voluntary and community groups and what they do.

Understand that groups have different views: peers, parents, teachers etc. and people of different faiths and cultures.

Know about the different national, regional, religious and ethnic groups and which of them are reflected in their school community.

Understand how their spending decisions affect them personally, the local economy, the environment and people in other parts of the world.

Understand how they and others can cause changes for better or for worse especially in their immediate surroundings and also in their wider community.

Know how advertising influences supply and demand.         

Consider why a sense of fair play is necessary in their dealings with their peers and others.

Consider why it is wrong for children to be bullied or abused by other children or adults.

Show interest in their local community and show a wider sense of social responsibility.

Appreciate home, school and community values.

Develop a concern for people and communities where human needs are not met, and consider the effect of inequalities which exist between people in different countries.

Be honest.

Consider the possible effects of lifestyle on health.

Value their own identity and background and those of others.

Appreciate the positive impact of human activity on plants, animals and the environment and value the aesthetic qualities of their surroundings.

 

 

3 Develop a

healthy, safer

lifestyle

Choose healthy options in relation to food, exercise, rest etc.

Manage hygiene procedures: e.g. food safety, menstruation.

Discuss and ask questions about changing bodily needs.

Decide who has access to their bodies.

Recognise risk in different situations and make judgements about behaviour and decisions about personal safety.

Recognise unwanted influence and pressure from friends particularly in relation to smoking; and exercise some basic techniques for resisting.

Identify hazards to health and safety at home, at school and in the environment.

Know some of the options open to them in developing a healthy lifestyle now and in the future.

Know what makes them feel happy and positive about life; the influence of exercise, leisure, relationships on mental health.

Know bacteria and viruses affect health and how transmission may be reduced by using simple, safe routines.

Know about different cultural practices in health and hygiene.

Know how changes at puberty affect body hygiene.

Know that body changes are a preparation for sexual maturity, and understand the processes of conception and birth.

Know about the range of human variation, understand what is meant by ‘normality’ and know that differences between people can be caused by their genes and environment.

Know about a range of legal drugs encountered in everyday life including over-the-counter drugs such as aspirin, drugs prescribed as medicines, as well as tea, coffee, tobacco and alcohol, and have some understanding of their effects and their associated risks.

Know that some substances are illegal and have some understanding of their effects and the associated risks.

Understand that pressure to take harmful or illegal substances may come from people they know such as friends, relatives and neighbours.

Know school rules/safety rules relating to medicines, alcohol, tobacco, solvents and illegal drugs; know that discarded syringes and needles can be dangerous.

Know basic emergency aid procedures and where to get help in different situations.

 

Respect their own and others’ bodies.

Consider the value of keeping healthy and different attitudes to health and illness.

Accept responsibility for personal cleanliness.

Consider the important and beneficial role which drugs have played in society as well as the costs to society of drug misuse.

Explore attitudes and beliefs about different drugs and the people who may use or misuse them; be able to recognise stereotypes.

Recognise that some role models for young people take drugs e.g. in sports, and explore feelings about them.

Develop a positive approach and self-motivation towards personal safety and risk-taking.

 

 

Develop good

relationships

and respect

the differences

between

people

Recognise their own and other people’s feelings.

Recognise that actions have consequences for themselves and others.

Put themselves into their parents’ shoes.

Show care for others as well as for themselves.

Treat animals with care and sensitivity.

Initiate friendships.

Develop skills needed for relationships e.g. listening, supporting, showing care.

Respond assertively to teasing and bullying.

Recognise and challenge stereotypes.

Demonstrate tolerance and respect for others.

 

Know what we do that makes each other happy, sad and cross, and what helps and what hinders friendships.

Know that people live their lives in different ways and that different cultures may have different life patterns.

Know that people’s responses to ideas and events may be determined by age, religion, culture.

Develop understanding of different types of relationship including marriage, and know that there are many different patterns of friendship.

Understand what families are and what members expect of each other.

Know how to deal with friendship problems.

Understand more about the changes that take place in human life – parenthood, bereavement, making new relationships.

Know about bullying, why it happens, its effects on people, how to deal with it and how to stop it happening.

Understand how media messages affect attitudes and can cause inequality of opportunity.

Know that human sexuality is expressed in different ways, understand what it means and have some words to describe it.

Know sources of help, including helplines, when facing problems.

Respect other people’s feelings, decisions, rights and bodies.

Value diversity of lifestyles, and the choices made within them.

Consider why honesty, loyalty, understanding and respect are important in relationships.

Appreciate different ways of loving and the importance of love in relationships.

Appreciate that similarities and differences between people are the result of many factors.

Consider their developing responsibilities at school, with friends and within the family.

 

 


Recording of Evidence

Teachers, pupils and parents will want to know what progress is being made in personal and social development. The different activities which contribute to the curriculum for PSD will generate opportunities to record learning and progress in different ways. Pupil profiles and Records of Achievement can provide a summative picture of the pupil. Formative evidence can be recorded by pupils in a number of ways.

Evidence of personal and social learning and development can come from:                                      

Self-assessment 

checklist

diary

displays

 

Peers

observation of role play

checklist

video/audio tapes

reflection in pairs or small groups

 

The group

graffiti sheets

reflection on a group activity

 

 

 

Teacher/TA

checklist

observation of role play

 

Photographs

Recorded responces

one to one reflection based

 

 

 

Documentation

Junior Citizenship awards

 

certificates of achievements

 

 

 

PSHE and Citizenship

 

PSHE is at the core of the school and pervades everything in school. PSHE needs to provide our pupils with the skills, knowledge and understanding they need to be able to function in society as responsible citizens.

This area of learning is about emotional well-being, knowing who you are, and where you fit in and feeling good about yourself. It is also about developing respect for others and social competence.

Many outside agencies are used as part of the PSHE programme e.g. school nurse, Police, Safe at Last. Y11 are also involved in the baby doll project and are given the opportunity to take home the baby doll for the weekend.

PSHE and Citizenship days have led to a wide variety of agencies being in school on many different topics. Parents are also invited to these days as well as certain PSHE lessons where it is important that the information given can be discussed at home.

We have also successfully achieved Healthy School status. Apart from Healthy Eating the school places emphasis on the social, cultural, spiritual and moral welfare of everyone in school.

 

Assessment

Assessment is carried out at the end of every term by the teacher who teaches that class for PSHE and Citizenship. We asses using the Rotherham Healthy Schools assessment tool. There is assessment for K.S. 1, 2, 3 and 4. Pupils may be assessed using more than one K.S. depending on ability e.g. some Y11 pupils are on K.S. 2 and 3.

 

Curriculum

Key Stage 2 and 3

The Rotherham Healthy Schools scheme of work is followed at K.S. 2 and 3. This scheme is not a prescriptive document; it provides a basis to be able to devise a scheme of work that reflects the needs of the school community.

 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Y 3/4

Feelings, Friends and Friendships

Focus on Special People

Keeping Healthy

Growing and Changing

Keeping Myself Safe

E-Safety: The real/virtual world

The World of Drugs

Y 5

Feelings and Relationships

Growing and Changing

Healthy Lifestyles

Me, My Community and the Environment

Keeping Myself Safe

E-Safety: How can I contact people who help me?

Focus on Outdoors

The World of Drugs

Y 6

Feelings, Friends and Friendships

Loss, Separation and Relationships

My Healthy Body-Food, Healthy Eating and Lifestyle

Rights and Responsibilities

Human Needs and Rights

Keeping Myself Safe

E-Safety: Using Email safely

The World of Drugs

Y 7

Feelings, Friends and Friendships

Respecting Differences Between People

The Environment

My Healthy Body

Caring for My Body

How Do Rules and Laws Affect Me?

Keeping Myself Safe

E-Safety: Responsible use of the internet

The World of Drugs

The Environment

Y 8

Bullies-Bullying, Pressures and Risks

E-Safety: ‘Chatting’ safely

Me and My Relationships-Memories

Lifestyles and Cultures

Citizenship

The Consequences of Inequality

Growing Up-Relationships and Responsibilities of Puberty

The World of Drugs

Y 9

Growing Up-Relationships

Money Management and Careers

Growing Up-Responsibilities Global Citizenship

E Safety: Multi Media Messaging

Global Difference and Diversity

The Ups and Downs of Puberty

The World of Drugs

 

Key Stage 4

The Willows follows its own scheme for PSHE and Citizenship. There is a detailed programme to follow for Y10 and Y11. The following is an outline of what is taught each term. Again this scheme is not a prescriptive document; it provides a basis to be able to devise a scheme of work that reflects the needs of the Y10 and Y11 groups.

 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Y10

Rules We Live By.

Personal Safety

Relationships

Myself and Others

Young Lifesaver Award

Respecting Differences between People

Y11

Relationships and Sexual Health

Relationships and Sexual Health

Difference and Diversity

Young People and the Law

Social Issues

Communities in which we Live

 


Religious Education

At The Willows school we believe that our pupils should have good understanding of different faiths and cultures in order to be a better member of a multicultural society. We aim to develop a respect for, and understanding of different religions and cultures as part of everything we do, not just within R.E lessons.

The R.E curriculum is based on the Rotherham agreed Syllabus for Religious Education, which can be found by following the link.

In our school we focus on celebrations and festivals which are happening within the year to make learning more relevant to our pupils. We make the R.E curriculum exciting and real for our pupils by visiting places of worship, inviting members of the community into school, taking part in workshops, holding whole school Multicultural days and making celebrations and festivals come alive within school.

Future multicultural days will be advertised on the website, where the children will take part in Dance, Art, Music and Cooking workshops throughout the day. They are exciting opportunity for the whole school to learn as a community.

 

OVERVIEW OF KEY STAGE 2 TOPICS

 

 

 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

 

Key stage 2

Year 3-6

 

 

Christianity and Islam

Special People

 

Symbols and religious expression

 

How do art, architecture and poetry express religious beliefs and ideas?

Special Times

Christianity - Christmas and celebrations

Why do we celebrate special times?

 

 

 

Special Places

 

Church and Mosque visit.

 

Why and how do special places and symbols help to show what they mean?

(Christianity and Islam).

Special Times

 

 

Christianity-The Easter story.

 

 

What matters most to Christians and to me?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Being special

 

 

 

 

Who was Muhammad/ Jesus? Why and how do people follow?

 

 

 

 

Special Places

 

Islam -Ramadam

 

Keeping the five pillars: what difference does it make to Muslims?

 

 

Significant days

 

Advent Sunday

 

Shrove Tuesday

Ash Wednesday

St David’s day

St Patrick s day

Palm Sunday

Good Friday

Easter Sunday

 

St Georges day

 

 

 

OVERVIEW OF KEY STAGE 3 TOPICS

 

 

 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

 

 

Year 7-9

Christianity, Islam and Hinduism

Special People

 

Vishnu or Shiva.

 

What do different people believe God is like? (Hinduism, Christianity and Islam)

Special Times

 

Celebration: Diwali, Raksha Bandan, Holi, the birthdays of Rama and Krishna; the food, symbolism, stories, customs, associated with celebration.

Special Places

 

Religious community’s

 

 

The beginning of the world: what can we learn from special Christian Islamic and Hinduism

Special Times

Ceremonies-special times marked in our lives.

 

Being special

 

 

 

 

 

Who was Muhammad/ Jesus? Why and how do people follow?

 

Special Places

 

Mosque, church and temple visits

 

 

Where how and why do people worship? (Hinduism, Christianity)

 

 

Special days

 

Advent Sunday

 

Shrove Tuesday

Ash Wednesday

St David’s day

 

St Patrick s day

Palm Sunday

Good Friday

Easter Sunday

 

St Georges day

 

 

 

 


Science

The aim of science is:

To give the pupils some insight and understanding of the contributions that science has had and is making to their everyday life. Through investigative science develop lively and enquiring minds; acquire skills, processes and concepts. Develop their confidence to approach new situations, apparatus and technology without fear but with due care and respect for safety. Through discovery learn about themselves and their environment. In practical and real life settings exercise and develop their cross curricular skills in English, Maths and communication skills.

To inspire pupils in the awe, magic and fun that is science!

Delivery of science

Science is taught throughout school focusing on the four areas throughout the year Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Scientific enquiry. These lessons are taught where possible in a hands on and fun approach making Science real and fun. Wherever it is feasible we will give pupils direct experiential learning involving them in making active decisions to develop their knowledge and understanding.

Science is taught throughout school focusing on the four areas throughout the year Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Scientific enquiry. These lessons are taught where possible in a hands on and fun approach making Science real and fun. Wherever it is feasible we will give pupils direct experiential learning involving them in making active decisions to develop their knowledge and understanding.

Scheme of work and overall organisation

Science topics have been selected to include a good balance, continuity and progression across all four-attainment targets. All Schemes of work and long term plans have been created by the science subject leader.

Primary science (Class L1 year 3-4 pupils) has a foundation stage curriculum based upon “Free Flow Learning with science being an integral part of their class based lessons. This is taught by their class teacher and topics are changed every half term fitting with topic if possible.

Primary science (Class L2 Year 5 pupils) have a double period of science which is delivered in units lasting one half term. This is taught by their class teacher.

Primary Science (Classes L3 and L4 Years 5 to Year 6 pupils) have a double period of science in their classes by a primary teacher. Science is delivered in topics that last for one term.

Classes L5 to U2 (Year 6 to Year 9 pupils) have a double period of science in the science room delivered by the science specialist. The science is delivered in topics that last for one term.

Year 10 and 11 Pupils have two periods of science. They follow the Edexel exam board “Entry Level Certificate in Science”. The course involves ESA “Externally set assessments” (a written test set by the exam board) and TDA “Teacher devised assessments” a practical set by the teacher. Pupils not accessing this exam will work towards a School based certificate

Topics covered are:

L1-L3

Autumn 1

All about me

Autumn 2

Christmas

Spring1

House and homes

Spring 2

Celebration and festivals

Summer 1

Transport/helping others

Summer 2

Seaside

Life process and living things

 

Our bodies

 

Physical process,

 

Toys and games

 

Life process and living things

 

Garden/Growing plants

Physical process,

 

Sound and hearing

 

Materials and their properties

 

Making our own vehicles for water, road and air.

Materials and their properties

 

Water/Grouping and changing materials

 

L4

Autumn 1

All about me

Autumn 2

Christmas

Spring1

House and homes

Spring 2

Celebration and festivals

Summer 1

Transport/helping others

Summer 2

Seaside

Life process and living things

 

Keeping healthy

 

Physical process,

 

The earth in space

 

Materials and their properties

 

Rocks and soils

Physical process,

 

Using Electricity

 

Materials and their properties

 

Grouping and classifying materials

 

Life process and living things

 

Plants and animals in their environment/ Thurcroft

 

L5-U2

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

 

Spring1

 

Spring 2

 

Summer 1

 

Summer 2

 

Life process and living things

 

Looking after our heart and lungs.

 

Keeping healthy

Materials and their properties

 

Investigating materials.

 

Physical process,

 

The earth in space

Life process and living things

 

Healthy eating

 

Food groups

 

Materials and their properties

 

Grouping and classifying materials

 

Physical process,

 

Electricity

 

 

Edexel entry level Science

U3-U5

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

 

Spring1

 

Spring 2

 

Summer 1

 

Summer 2

 

Health and food

 

Earth and space

 

Changes in humans and plants

 

Classification and variation

 

Acids and metals

 

Genetics and evolution

 

 

Topic

The Topic based approach allows children to become motivated and inspired to become successful learners through a curriculum which is based on the Personal Learning and Thinking Skills (PLTS). These help promote learning challenges, planned in response to the needs and interests of the children. With the right balance of challenge and support, children are actively involved in a range of memorable learning experiences which promote creativity, independence and enjoyment. We have a strong commitment to the development of basic skills through integrating literacy and numeracy skills throughout the curriculum. We aim to provide a range of opportunities which give every child the chance to shine and hopefully develop interests which they will continue to pursue beyond school.

Open PDF Open PDF
































Vocational Centre

We are proud of our Vocational Centre building. Here, our pupils and pupils of other educational establishments, can study for NOCN intoductory qualifications in; Painting and Decorating, Bricklaying and Carpentry and Joinery. Providing pupils with practical experience of these these trades helps them progress their carear development when they leave school.

Pupils experience these trades in a work like environment and will use professional tools in real-life situations

Painting and Decorating: Pupils paint a 3D Tudor Pattern and undertake other specially designed projects.

Brick Laying: Pupils build walls and pillars and specially designed projects.

Carpentry and Joinery: Pupils manufacture products in joinery like bird boxes, bird tables and planters and also undertake other specially designed projects.